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Notice Type
General Section
Notice Title

Schedule 5 – Nutrient Profiling Scoring Method – Food Standards (Proposal P1025 – Code Revision) Variation—Australia New Zealand Food Standards Code – Amendment No. 154

The Board of Food Standards Australia New Zealand gives notice of the making of this standard under section 92 of the Food Standards Australia New Zealand Act 1991.

The Standard commences on 1 March 2016.

Dated 25 March 2015

Standards Management Officer, Delegate of the Board of Food Standards Australia New Zealand.

Note:

This Standard will be published in the Commonwealth of Australia Gazette No. FSC 96 on 10 April 2015.

Note 1 This instrument is a standard under the Food Standards Australia New Zealand Act 1991 (Cth). The standards together make up the Australia New Zealand Food Standards Code. See also section 1.1.1—3.

This Standard, together with Schedule 4 and Schedule 6, relates to Standard 1.2.7 (nutrition, health and related claims), and sets out information for the purpose of that Standard.

Note 2 The provisions of the Code that apply in New Zealand are incorporated in, or adopted under, the Food Act 2014 (NZ). See also section 1.1.1—3.

S5—1 Name

This Standard is Australia New Zealand Food Standards Code – Schedule 5 – Nutrient profiling scoring method.

Note Commencement: This Standard commences on 1 March 2016, being the date specified as the commencement date in notices in the Gazette and the New Zealand Gazette under section 92 of the Food Standards Australia New Zealand Act 1991 (Cth). See also section 93 of that Act.

S5—2 Steps in determining a nutrient profiling score

(1) For a food in Category 1 in the table to section S4—6, calculate the food’s:

(a) baseline points in accordance with section S5—3; then

(b) fruit and vegetable points in accordance with section S5—4 (V points); then

(c) protein points in accordance with section S5—5 (P points); then

(d) final score in accordance with section S5—7 (the nutrient profile score).

Note Category 1 foods do not score fibre (F) points.

(2) For a food in Category 2 in the table to section S4—6, calculate the food’s:

(a) baseline points in accordance with section S5—3; then

(b) fruit and vegetable points in accordance with section S5—4 (V points); then

(c) protein points in accordance with section S5—5 (P points); then

(d) fibre points in accordance with section S5—6 (F points); then

(e) final score in accordance with section S5—7 (the nutrient profile score).

(3) For a food in Category 3 in the table to section S4—6, calculate the food’s:

(a) baseline points in accordance with section S5—3; then

(b) fruit and vegetable points in accordance with section S5—4 (V points); then

(c) protein points in accordance with section S5—5 (P points); then

(d) fibre points in accordance with section S5—6 (F points); then

(e) final score in accordance with section S5—7 (the nutrient profile score).

S5—3 Baseline Points

Calculate the baseline points for the content of energy and each nutrient in a *unit quantity of the food (based on the units used in the nutrition information panel) using the following equation:

Formula for calculating baseline points

where:

T is the total baseline points.

AEC is the number of points for average energy content:

(a) for category 1 or category 2 foods—in table 1; and

(b) for category 3 foods—in table 2.

ASFA is the number of points for average saturated fatty acids:

(a) for category 1 or category 2 foods—in table 1; and

(b) for category 3 foods—in table 2.

ATS is the number of points for average total sugars

(a) for category 1 or category 2 foods—in table 1; and

(b) for category 3 foods—in table 2.

AS is the number of points for average sodium:

(a) for category 1 or category 2 foods—in table 1; and

(b) for category 3 foods—in table 2.

Table 1—Baseline points for Category 1 or 2 foods

Baseline points Average energy content (kJ) per unit quantity Average saturated fatty acids (g) per unit quantity Average total sugars (g) per unit quantity Average sodium (mg) per unit quantity
0 ≤ 335 ≤ 1.0 ≤ 5.0 ≤ 90
1 > 335 > 1.0 > 5.0 > 90
2 > 670 > 2.0 > 9.0 > 180
3 > 1 005 > 3.0 > 13.5 > 270
4 > 1 340 > 4.0 > 18.0 > 360
5 > 1 675 > 5.0 > 22.5 > 450
6 > 2 010 > 6.0 > 27.0 > 540
7 > 2 345 > 7.0 > 31.0 > 630
8 > 2 680 > 8.0 > 36.0 > 720
9 > 3 015 > 9.0 > 40.0 > 810
10 > 3 350 > 10.0 > 45.0 > 900


Table 2—Baseline points for Category 3 foods

Baseline points Average energy content (kJ) per unit quantity Average saturated fatty acids (g) per unit quantity Average total sugars (g) per unit quantity Average sodium (mg) per unit quantity
0 ≤ 335 ≤ 1.0 ≤ 5.0 ≤ 90
1 > 335 > 1.0 > 5.0 > 90
2 > 670 > 2.0 > 9.0 > 180
3 > 1 005 > 3.0 > 13.5 > 270
4 > 1 340 > 4.0 > 18.0 > 360
5 > 1 675 > 5.0 > 22.5 > 450
6 > 2 010 > 6.0 > 27.0 > 540
7 > 2 345 > 7.0 > 31.0 > 630
8 > 2 680 > 8.0 > 36.0 > 720
9 > 3 015 > 9.0 > 40.0 > 810
10 > 3 350 > 10.0 > 45.0 > 900
11 > 3 685 > 11.0   > 990
12   > 12.0   > 1 080
13   > 13.0   > 1 170
14   > 14.0   > 1 260
15   > 15.0   > 1 350
16   > 16.0   > 1 440
17   > 17.0   > 1 530
18   > 18.0   > 1 620
19   > 19.0   > 1 710
20   > 20.0   > 1 800
21   > 21.0   > 1 890
22   > 22.0   > 1 980
23   > 23.0   > 2 070
24   > 24.0   > 2 160
25   > 25.0   > 2 250
26   > 26.0   > 2 340
27   > 27.0   > 2 430
28   > 28.0   > 2 520
29   > 29.0   > 2 610
30   > 30.0   > 2 700


S5—4 Fruit and vegetable points (V points)

(1) V points can be scored for fruits, vegetables, nuts and legumes including coconut, spices, herbs, fungi, seeds and algae (fvnl) including:

(a) fvnl that are fresh, cooked, frozen, canned, pickled or preserved; and

(b) fvnl that have been peeled, diced or cut (or otherwise reduced in size), puréed or dried.

(2) V points cannot be scored for:

(a) a constituent, extract or isolate of a food mentioned in subsection (1); or

(b) cereal grains mentioned as a class of food in Schedule 22.

Note An example of a constituent, extract or isolate under paragraph (a) is peanut oil derived from peanuts. In this example, peanut oil would not be able to score V points. Other examples of extracts or isolates are fruit pectin and de-ionised juice.

(3) Despite subsection (2), V points may be scored for:

(a) fruit juice or vegetable juice including concentrated juices and purées;

(b) coconut flesh (which is to be scored as a nut), whether juiced, dried or desiccated, but not processed coconut products such as coconut milk, coconut cream or coconut oil; and

(c) the water in the centre of the coconut.

(4) Calculate the percentage of fvnl in the food in accordance with the appropriate method in Standard 1.2.10 and not the form of the food determined in accordance with section 1.2.7—7.

Note The effect of subsection (4) is to make it a requirement to determine the percentage of fvnl using only the appropriate method in Standard 1.2.10. For this paragraph only, it is not necessary to consider the form of the food determined by section 1.2.7—7.

(5) Use Column 1 of Table 3 if the fruit or vegetables in the food are all concentrated (including dried).

Note For example, if dried fruit and tomato paste are the components of the food for which V points can be scored, Column 1 should be used.

(6) Use Column 2 of Table 3 if:

(a) there are no concentrated (or dried) fruit or vegetables in the food; or

(b) the percentages of all concentrated ingredients are calculated based on the ingredient when reconstituted (according to subsection 1.2.10—4(3) or subsection 1.2.10—4(4)); or

(c) the food contains a mixture of concentrated fruit or vegetables and non-concentrated fvnl sources (after following the equation mentioned in subsection (8)); or

(d) the food is potato crisps or a similar low moisture vegetable product.

(7) Work out the V points (to a maximum of 8) in accordance with Table 3.

Table 3—V Points

  Column 1 Column 2
Points % concentrated fruit or vegetables % fvnl
0 < 25 ≤ 40
1 ≥ 25 > 40
2 ≥ 43 > 60
5 ≥ 67 > 80
8 = 100 = 100


(8) If the food contains a mixture of concentrated fruit or vegetables and non-concentrated fvnl sources, the percentage of total fvnl must be worked out as follows:

Formula for calculating percentage of total fvnl

where:

NC is the percentage of non-concentrated fvnl ingredients in the food determined using the appropriate calculation method in Standard 1.2.10.

C is the percentage of concentrated fruit or vegetable ingredients in the food determined using the appropriate calculation method in Standard 1.2.10.

NI is the percentage of non-fvnl ingredients in the food determined using the appropriate calculation method outlined in Standard 1.2.10.

(9) For the equation in subsection (8), potato crisps and similar low moisture vegetable products are taken to be non-concentrated.

S5—5 Protein points (P points)

(1) Use Table 4 to determine the ‘P points’ scored, depending on the amount of protein in the food. A maximum of five points can be awarded.

(2) Foods that score ≥ 13 baseline points are not permitted to score points for protein unless they score five or more V points.

Table 4—P Points

Points Protein (g) per 100 g or 100 mL
0 ≤ 1.6
1 > 1.6
2 ≥ 3.2
3 > 4.8
4 > 6.4
5 > 8.0


S5—6 Fibre points (F points)

(1) Use Table 5 to determine the ‘F points’ scored, depending on the amount of *dietary fibre in the food. A maximum of five points can be awarded.

(2) The prescribed method of analysis to determine total dietary fibre is outlined in S11—4.

Table 5—F Points

Points Dietary fibre (g) per 100 g or 100 mL
0 ≤0.9
1 >0.9
2 >1.9
3 >2.8
4 >3.7
5 >4.7


(3) Category 1 foods do not score F points.

S5—7 Calculating the final score

Calculate the final score using the following equation:

Formula for calculating final score

where:

F is the final score.

BP is the number of baseline points.

VP is the number of V points.

PP is the number of P points.

FP is the number of F points.